NHMRC Public Consultations

Skip Navigation and go to Content
Visit NHMRC website

Proposed Changes to NHMRCs 2012 Infant Feeding Guidelines submission

ID: 
21
This submission reflects the views of
Organisation Name: 
Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy
Personal Details
Question 1
Do you agree with the proposed change? If no, please provide rationale and relevant citations: 
As we have previously outlined, we are in favour of all these edits, having raised the inconsistencies between the various documents and errors initially. We again urge the NHMRC to include into their documents a sentence which encapsulates current evidence on the potential risk of delayed introduction of solids. ASCIA will be updating its own infant feeding advice and primary prevention documents this year in light of recent publications..... example sentence...... “There is high level evidence (for some allergenic foods such as peanut) that significantly delaying introduction in infants at high risk of food allergy increases the risk of food allergy.” This is in reference to results from the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut allergy) trial that were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM): www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1414850. Moreover, there is an absence of evidence that delaying allergenic foods prevents allergies to these foods from developing in infants. Observational evidence from large birth cohorts suggests that there is no protection from allergic disease (including food allergy) by delayed introduction of allergenic foods. These studies include, but are not limited to: Nwaru JACI 2013; Zutavern A, Pediatrics 2011; Joseph CL, JACI 2011; Sariachvili M, PAI 2010; Koplin JK, JACI 2010.
Question 2
Do you agree with the proposed change? If no, please provide rationale and relevant citations: 
As we have previously outlined, we are in favour of all these edits, having raised the inconsistencies between the various documents and errors initially. We again urge the NHMRC to include into their documents a sentence which encapsulates current evidence on the potential risk of delayed introduction of solids. ASCIA will be updating its own infant feeding advice and primary prevention documents this year in light of recent publications..... example sentence...... “There is high level evidence (for some allergenic foods such as peanut) that significantly delaying introduction in infants at high risk of food allergy increases the risk of food allergy.” This is in reference to results from the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut allergy) trial that were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM): www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1414850. Moreover, there is an absence of evidence that delaying allergenic foods prevents allergies to these foods from developing in infants. Observational evidence from large birth cohorts suggests that there is no protection from allergic disease (including food allergy) by delayed introduction of allergenic foods. These studies include, but are not limited to: Nwaru JACI 2013; Zutavern A, Pediatrics 2011; Joseph CL, JACI 2011; Sariachvili M, PAI 2010; Koplin JK, JACI 2010.
Question 3
Do you agree with the proposed change? If no, please provide rationale and relevant citations: 
As we have previously outlined, we are in favour of all these edits, having raised the inconsistencies between the various documents and errors initially. We again urge the NHMRC to include into their documents a sentence which encapsulates current evidence on the potential risk of delayed introduction of solids. ASCIA will be updating its own infant feeding advice and primary prevention documents this year in light of recent publications..... example sentence...... “There is high level evidence (for some allergenic foods such as peanut) that significantly delaying introduction in infants at high risk of food allergy increases the risk of food allergy.” This is in reference to results from the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut allergy) trial that were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM): www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1414850. Moreover, there is an absence of evidence that delaying allergenic foods prevents allergies to these foods from developing in infants. Observational evidence from large birth cohorts suggests that there is no protection from allergic disease (including food allergy) by delayed introduction of allergenic foods. These studies include, but are not limited to: Nwaru JACI 2013; Zutavern A, Pediatrics 2011; Joseph CL, JACI 2011; Sariachvili M, PAI 2010; Koplin JK, JACI 2010.

Page reviewed: 16 September, 2015